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Author Topic: Radio astronomy.  (Read 41323 times)

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Offline davemahoney

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #15 on: 22:27:51, 02 December, 2007 »
BTW if any one is interested.........please turn your phones off :lol: :lol:

Dave.
Skywatcher ED80 pro
Celestron 114mm short newt.
ASTSC1C Webcam.
Fuji finepix s3500.
Bresser 10x50 bins.
Switched Systems electronic focuser.
And a couple of eyepieces and filters.

Offline deepsky

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #16 on: 22:34:59, 02 December, 2007 »
As someone who does regular meteor obs I was completely fascinated by the Sky at Night show on the Perseids and the radio detection kit they had set up.  I thought it would be an extremely expensive area to get into, but I could not have been more wrong. Those guys are using recording and analysis software which is basically free. The Yagi aerials are dead cheap too. You can pick up the receivers they are using for £30 - £100 on Ebay. In fact most of the receivers they are using are now discontinued so I would image there is even better equipment on the market now in that price range - or pick up the old ones for next to nowt.

I have contacted Andy Smith who was on the programme for more information on getting set up as cheaply as possible. His website is here if anyone wants to see his setup http://www.tvcomm.co.uk/radio/
Visit the Sunnymeade Astro Solar Blog http://sunnymeade.wordpress.com/

The iTelescope remote telescope network, Vixen 115s 4.5" APO, Equinox ED80, PST Ha, PST CaK, Lunt B1200 CaK diagonal, EQ6 Pro, Canon 350D, DMK 21, DMK 41, LVI Smartguider 2, Maxim DL 5, Photoshop CS2

Offline deepsky

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #17 on: 23:59:23, 02 December, 2007 »
Just got a reply from Andy and it looks like £200 - £250 would have you set up with a radio meteor observatory assuming you already have a desktop/laptop spare for this (as most of us imaging probably have). The Spectrum lab software they use is free. The receivers are £100 - £150 and the antenna is £50 - £100. Bad timing for me just before Christmas, but I can see me getting some kit in the New Year.  The bad news about the hobby is that it may only have a 4-6 year year lifespan as all of the analogue transmitters that they use are slowly being switched off  :(
Visit the Sunnymeade Astro Solar Blog http://sunnymeade.wordpress.com/

The iTelescope remote telescope network, Vixen 115s 4.5" APO, Equinox ED80, PST Ha, PST CaK, Lunt B1200 CaK diagonal, EQ6 Pro, Canon 350D, DMK 21, DMK 41, LVI Smartguider 2, Maxim DL 5, Photoshop CS2

Offline Kellys_eye

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #18 on: 00:07:09, 03 December, 2007 »
You can get a very good SDR (software defined radio) from here:

http://www.elektor.com/products/kits-modules/modules/software-defined-radio-(070039-91).91475.lynkx

It has a very good selection of software (free) available for it, is PC controlled (uses USB and your soundcard) and the spectrum displays would be ideal.

Cheap too  :D
Dave Gill

250/f4.5 newt, 150/f5 refractor, Mak 127, lots of bits'n'pieces mostly homebrewed.

Offline davemahoney

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #19 on: 00:09:13, 03 December, 2007 »
 :thumbup:

Dave, :D
Skywatcher ED80 pro
Celestron 114mm short newt.
ASTSC1C Webcam.
Fuji finepix s3500.
Bresser 10x50 bins.
Switched Systems electronic focuser.
And a couple of eyepieces and filters.

Offline deepsky

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #20 on: 00:16:34, 03 December, 2007 »
Interesting, but I would probably electrocute myself putting together kit boards like that one. Meteors need 40-70Mhz coverage which that one does not seem to extend to. Most of the UK radio meteor people are using ICOM PCR 1000 or PCR 1500 receivers connected to your soundcard or USB input.
Visit the Sunnymeade Astro Solar Blog http://sunnymeade.wordpress.com/

The iTelescope remote telescope network, Vixen 115s 4.5" APO, Equinox ED80, PST Ha, PST CaK, Lunt B1200 CaK diagonal, EQ6 Pro, Canon 350D, DMK 21, DMK 41, LVI Smartguider 2, Maxim DL 5, Photoshop CS2

Offline Roger Banks

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #21 on: 08:06:59, 03 December, 2007 »
Meteor scatter is a known and well used phenomenon in ham radio. Bouncing VHF sigs off the ionisation trails behind meteors is a whole field of ham radio in itself - and great fun too!!
ROg

Offline Kellys_eye

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #22 on: 13:13:45, 03 December, 2007 »
The SDR can use mixers to increase the frequency span.

Whilst the ICOM range of radios are excellent devices the prices are somewhat steep!

Electrocution is not possible when making aforementioned kit and it is also available ready-built for an additional (reasonable) charge.
Dave Gill

250/f4.5 newt, 150/f5 refractor, Mak 127, lots of bits'n'pieces mostly homebrewed.

Offline johnleepbs

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #23 on: 18:22:14, 03 December, 2007 »
The problem with all this is what you mean about images...

Those with amateur radio licences, I count 3 more, already (probably) have the equipment to obtain valuable scientific data inside the solar system. Yagi antennas pointed up will, for instance, give valuable information about solar storms, Jupiter etc etc.

In deep space, you can hear pulsars, but this is not original work, interesting,  but not original; just observing

However, can you integrate your  visual deepsky images and combine them with your radio data? . Errr no... thats why they built Jodrell Bank  ;) They can stand side by side as an indication of what you can see or image, but not together....... that needs huge antennas

John


LX200 and WO 90 side by side mounted on EQ6 in a shed :-) , hacked D70s and a couple of old cooled Starlight cams

Offline apollo

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #24 on: 15:50:57, 04 December, 2007 »
Wonder if it's possible to build a UKAI Radio Interferometer Network ... now that would be cool  :D Surely amateurs these days can pull off stuff the pro's pioneered back in 1946 ...   ;)
Simon C. Smith.
12" UHTC Meade LX200 Classic, 8" Meade Starfinder, Skywatcher 80ED, Canon 20D, ToUCam Pro (Modded for LE), Astronomy Limiting Babies.

Offline Roger Banks

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #25 on: 16:27:23, 04 December, 2007 »

However, can you integrate your  visual deepsky images and combine them with your radio data? . Errr no... thats why they built Jodrell Bank  ;) They can stand side by side as an indication of what you can see or image, but not together....... that needs huge antennas


Problem is that if you choose, say 70MHZ to listen to then the wavelength is 4 METRES so an antenna array of just 10bD is about 7 metres long. To hear your own signal bounce back off the moon you have to account for path losses around 280dB if I remember correctly. When I did do this on 50Mhz (6 metres) you needed a minimum of 1KW pep and tx gain of 12-15 dB and a freindly USA receiver with half an acre dedicated to a listening array.
It's also not just about hearing something it's working out exactly where it has come from - to pinpoint signals down to narrow fov's you need huge gain....

Offline davemahoney

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #26 on: 18:07:49, 04 December, 2007 »
Here is an interesting site for budding Radio astronomers.
The equipment is quite cheap and includes the circuit diagram for those who take the short cut ;) you'll have to search though :D
http://radiojove.gsfc.nasa.gov/

Dave.
Skywatcher ED80 pro
Celestron 114mm short newt.
ASTSC1C Webcam.
Fuji finepix s3500.
Bresser 10x50 bins.
Switched Systems electronic focuser.
And a couple of eyepieces and filters.

Offline johnleepbs

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #27 on: 18:28:47, 04 December, 2007 »
You ignored the 3 above posts Dave, at least of which two know about radio work, however exciting this may seem from a back garden  :roll:

Radio imaging Jupiter, just listen in , or the sun, is easy. Kids do this as astronomy projects...... Radiojove is the USA example.

But this is nothing that could be combined with Astroimaging, except as a warning system for intra solar system events

John

LX200 and WO 90 side by side mounted on EQ6 in a shed :-) , hacked D70s and a couple of old cooled Starlight cams

Offline davemahoney

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #28 on: 18:52:26, 04 December, 2007 »
Party pooper
You ignored the 3 above posts Dave, at least of which two know about radio work, however exciting this may seem from a back garden  :roll:

Radio imaging Jupiter, just listen in , or the sun, is easy. Kids do this as astronomy projects...... Radiojove is the USA example.

But this is nothing that could be combined with Astroimaging, except as a warning system for intra solar system events

John


Advancement of science is important, even on this forum. A lot of people are interested in the concepts of radio astronomy and it's application with the visual, Photons are Photons no matter the frequency, therefore an ambition or misguided belief that this cannot be done cheeses me off.
We all live on a small budget, but backyard astronomy in the early days broke new bounds.
The backyard astronomer these days can still contribute and help break the bounds, and contribute to science.

Also i do not ignore posts. I read them on their merit!!!!
Can you be constructive by indicating good online articles regarding amature radio astronomy?

Dave :roll:

BTW the enclosed image is M31 from the NAOA site.



[attachment deleted by admin]
Skywatcher ED80 pro
Celestron 114mm short newt.
ASTSC1C Webcam.
Fuji finepix s3500.
Bresser 10x50 bins.
Switched Systems electronic focuser.
And a couple of eyepieces and filters.

Offline Roger Banks

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Re: Radio astronomy.
« Reply #29 on: 19:52:26, 04 December, 2007 »
As I said Dave, its all about getting enough gain to focus in on what you want to listen to. Light waves are much much storter wavelength than radio waves so you can have high gain systems (aka telescopes) in tiny packages. Magnify a C11 up to cope with the wavelengths of radio frequencies and - well you get Jodrell Bank.
Widefield antennas will just pick up noise - no detail whatsoever as to where it's coming from.
The only way forward is to pick very very very high radio frequencies (100's of GHz) but that requires huge investments in technology to build the electronics to make receiving at these frequencies possible...
Rog

 

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