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Author Topic: not everyones cup of tea  (Read 5622 times)

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Offline MrYannah

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not everyones cup of tea
« on: 23:07:33, 11 March, 2010 »
hi, watching the sky at night this week about life elsewhere in the universe. I thought this was the best programme i have seen so far which intelligently considers the possibility. Currently this topic is either frowned upon or laughed at but I think it is a genuinely fascinating subject, especially when it is considered we may be alone in the Universe. I really enjoyed listening to Prof Paul Davies rationalisations on the possibility of life elsewhere in the universe being between zero and 1 when considered against the drake equation which could be considered to be quite misleading. The thought that we are IT is compelling and frightening and i think it would be interesting to see what would happen if this idea were to be promoted in the media. I personally like to think we are not alone and there is intelligent life teaming in the galaxy and beyond but the question is whether intelligent life is interested enough in us to pay us a visit or two.

The fact that we have evolved which lets us consider the possibility should not bias our thoughts on the readiness of life to evolve is absolutely true IMO. But i did get the impression that scientists in general do not want to commit themselves as thinking intelligent life must exist given the size/scale of the universe. It is a shame it has come to this that simple ideas of thinking aliens exist can make a person appear either pathetically prone to star trek fantasies or mentally unstable, although having seen some documentaries from the USA i can understand why. But i do consider it to be a very thought provoking idea that we may not be alone. Something along the lines of the simple scale of our own solar system.


anyway i was particularly impressed by this programme and am eager to hear any thoughts

Raymond

Offline graham.b

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Re: not everyones cup of tea
« Reply #1 on: 02:27:31, 12 March, 2010 »
I do like to think there is some thing else, but to what, well. If you were a ship on a track around this planet, what would be your thoughts on the mental behaviour of the beings on it.

 Wars, starvation, this planet has not the best of the friendliest way of inviting any being on passing route. If by chance they have watched any of the alien movies, would you risk it.

Offline Ian Straton

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Re: not everyones cup of tea
« Reply #2 on: 08:53:13, 12 March, 2010 »
Well my first thought is that the probability of life elsewhere is not "between zero and one" but is either zero or one.

That is to say it is not possible for life to slightly exist, it either does or doesn't, the subtlty is whether that life is a) intellegent
b) intellegent enough to make interstellar contact.
This is where the drake equation comes in.

I think pushing the idea to the media that we are alone would result in bugger all coverage and bugger all change to anything.   Basically the mindset of most people is either to never consider the possibilities or to assume that we are the special case.  Finding life (any life) elsewhere however would however cause pandamonium.

Offline Geoff_k

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Re: not everyones cup of tea
« Reply #3 on: 10:47:30, 12 March, 2010 »
Given the age of the universe, I sometimes wonder how many civilisations elsewhere have risen and fallen and we will never know anything about them. If we ever get out into interstellar space we might find ruins and little else.

Perhaps we will go the same way.

If there is any evidence of other life it will no doubt prompt acres of silly stories in certain sections of the media even though given the vastness of space and the age of the universe we probably won't meet them and they certainly won't be a threat to us.

Offline Kellys_eye

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Re: not everyones cup of tea
« Reply #4 on: 11:35:19, 12 March, 2010 »
I'm sure any advanced civilisation, seeingthe way we operate, should be nothing less than understanding as I suggest that any civilisation would go through the same types of difficulties and differences that we are doing.
Something 'typical' of humans is also the ability to be so self-obsessed as to imagine that WE are the only intelligent being in existence.....
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Offline StarMan

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Re: not everyones cup of tea
« Reply #5 on: 12:07:12, 12 March, 2010 »
Any extraterrestrial civilizations who had been monitoring us for any length of time would best demonstrate their intelligence by giving our species a wide berth for a century or two.

Our own civilization is probably not quite mature enough just yet.


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Offline swashy

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Re: not everyones cup of tea
« Reply #6 on: 15:13:22, 12 March, 2010 »
To think we are alone in this universe is more disturbing than to think the opposite
Ade

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Offline MrYannah

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Re: not everyones cup of tea
« Reply #7 on: 22:56:15, 12 March, 2010 »
i especially liked the professor absolute denial that aliens have visited us since the dawn of society 10,000 years ago approx given cosmological timescales of million of years. It made clear his despise of the media portrayed myth of aliens visiting earth. The fact it takes such a long time, generations, even to move to another solar stem was highlighted by this comment.

Offline stealthtech

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Re: not everyones cup of tea
« Reply #8 on: 23:46:14, 12 March, 2010 »
It's an interesting topic, this, and everyone will have their own opinion.

Personally, I hope life exists elsewhere. Whether we determine that life to be 'intelligent' for me is immaterial. We, ourselves, evolved to become intelligent creatures and I sincerely hope this is a trait not unique to our world. Younger and older civilizations could be out there, with the same questions we are asking. I know it is an age old theory, and there are arguments to the contrary, but can we really be the only rock in the universe that happened to generate precisely the right conditions to create life? It saddens me to think the answer could be yes and I will always hope, until I draw my last breath, we are not alone. The universe is too fantastic a place to be wasted on just one civilization. Surely that spark of life is equally likely to occur elsewhere as it is to fail, in the same proportions.

The one argument that I think did carry weight was the fact that SETI may need to broaden it's search criteria in the hope of finding some kind of evidence of civilization. It's a sad thing, but I don't think, with technology as it is now, they will find evidence in my lifetime.

This is always a fascinating and compelling debate, and I love to hear other peoples views and opinions on this topic.

Good topic, Raymond

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Offline MrYannah

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Re: not everyones cup of tea
« Reply #9 on: 04:33:30, 13 March, 2010 »
i did like the suggestion that turning the seti ambition to the centre of the galaxy was good as that is would be were more advanced civilisations would occur as that is a more likley place to find life it being older. Anyway loved the programme. Hats off to Patrick and the team.

Offline swashy

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Re: not everyones cup of tea
« Reply #10 on: 00:47:56, 15 March, 2010 »
So, given the Drake eqation etc etc, there is an abundance of intelligent life forms in the universe, but has anyone ever worked out when we can start to expect to see visitors from other worlds? has there indeed been long enough time yet for an advanced race to evolve enough to develop the technology for interstellar travel, and just how far away from their own planet would they have ventured? 

It's a big place, and there may well be those beings in existence, but they may not arrive here 'till long after we have ceased, and miss all the fun!  Aint' life just full of dissapointments!
Ade

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Offline swashy

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Re: not everyones cup of tea
« Reply #11 on: 01:03:48, 15 March, 2010 »
When you think about it, time is really our enemy here, if you consider that life on earth has been in existance for, say, a couple of billions of years, and we as the intelligent 'ones' are the product of such a system, recently arrived, we may well cease to exist in that sort of time frame in the future, if not sooner, and to put that into perspective, it's a short 'blip' of time compared to how old we think the univere may be, there may well be lots of intelligent life forms evolving all the time, but at different times to ourselves, so we may never meet our 'similar' inteligent lifeforms, simply because of the 'time' we live in

Ade

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Offline MrYannah

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Re: not everyones cup of tea
« Reply #12 on: 17:23:03, 15 March, 2010 »
indeed, maybe the true test of intelligence is taking to the stars and and expanding our environment so that the sheer numbers of us ensure against our extinction. I think once a life form such as our reaches the trillions it would be relatively safe to assume it would not be about to go extinct. But knowing us we would create the equivalent of the atomic bomb in space and the danger would be blowing up the galaxy instead of just the world.

I agree time is our enemy, if only we could guarantee longer life and increased health. But these things do seem to be on the way with genetic research etc. I think it would be at least 1000 years before we are venturing into space regularly and safely the same way people fly around the world. Unless someone can develop the idea of lifts into space using tethers attached to the ground.

Its quite a frustrating subject really, looking to the future too long and you forget to live in the present and enjoy your time or earth.

Personally I dont think we will be discovering any intelligent civilisations in the next 50 years. But to even find a microbe on Mars would be awesome and may even generate renewed interest in the space program.

so here is hoping


Offline theyppmc

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Re: not everyones cup of tea
« Reply #13 on: 13:56:33, 21 March, 2010 »
A good program indeed i thought, it always disturbs me though that we ask the question as to if there is intelligent life out there, why intelligent life?, for my part, i`m more interested as to whether theres life of any sort, lets find out if theres life on other worlds in our own solar system first, then go from there, just finding a second unknown life form in our own solar system would be a great leap in the search, and lets face it, finding such evidence in our solar system would increase the chances of life being possible elsewhere in the universe, as far as we know at the moment, life only exists on our planet, if it can be proven that life exisits in any form on Mars or one of the solar systems moons, then i think we can be sure that life is wide spread through out the universe.

As to intelligent life, well thats a whole other question!

Tom.
  

Offline starf

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Re: not everyones cup of tea
« Reply #14 on: 11:44:23, 14 April, 2010 »
If there are 90 natural elements and 10 man-made ones. would it make sense to do spectroscopic studies to search out the man-made. Or are these elements so highly radio-active that they decay much too quickly?

oops i think thats wrong there seems to be more like 20 man made-ones

 

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