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Author Topic: June 2011 Sky Guide  (Read 2127 times)

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Offline koootzz

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June 2011 Sky Guide
« on: 17:47:02, 01 June, 2011 »


June Sky Guide

New moon on the 1st, full moon on the 15th. There is a total lunar eclipse on the 15th as the moon rises at approx 21.26, totality ends at 22.03 with the eclipse ending at 23.02.
A 4.3% illuminated crescent will be visible on the 3rd (evening) and also a 5.5% illuminated one on the 29th (morning). For those liking a challenge there are thinner crescents visible on the 2nd and 30th.

Planets

Mercury will be visible at the beginning of the month for a short while before sunrise. The planet then moves too close to the Sun during June before becoming viewable again from around the 20th  in the evening.

Venus will be visible in the early morning, approx ¾ hour before sunrise.

Mars visible about an hour before sunrise early in the month, getting earlier as the month passes.

Jupiter visible in the early hours this month with conditions becoming more favourable as the month passes.

Saturn is visible through to about 2.20 through the month, the planet will become stationary around the 13th before changing to prograde motion.


Comets visible this month (to mag 12)

There are no comets brighter than mag 12 forecast this month.

ISS Passes

There are ISS passes visible almost everyday throughout June. These are early morning passes at the beginning of the month becoming earlier towards the end.
For 10 day listings for your location please check www.heavens-above.com (free registration required).

 
Deep Sky

Best deep sky imaging is from the 1st to the 8th and from the 24th on.

As June has the longest days of the year, deep sky imaging is difficult with only an hour or two of usable darkness each night. For imagers further North the situation is even worse. For the dedicated, it is wise to choose objects that can be imaged with relatively little exposure time such as M57, the Ring Nebula or M27 The Dumbell.
Brocchi's cluster (the coathanger) is another popular target this month. Due to the short nights visual observation can be a good alternative, try the double stars Albireo in Cygnus (lovely colours) and the 'Double Double' in Lyra.
Leigh
vixen 60s, modded 1000D, modded 300D, DSI I, 10" dob (work in progress), some other bits and a stupendous talent for attracting cloud!

 

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